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WISE event 12/12/2017 12:00 h.

CNIO Auditorium

Margarita de Cos. Large Donors Account Head. WWF España, Madrid, Spain

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NewsMachines taught by photos learn a sexist view of women (Wired)

Last fall, University of Virginia computer science professor Vicente Ordonez noticed a pattern in some of the guesses made by image-recognition software he was building. "It would see a picture of a kitchen and more often than not associate it with women, not men," he says.

Full article: Machines taught by photos learn a sexist view of women

Science doesn't explain tech's diversity problem - History does (The Verge)

In 2017, the idea that biological differences drive social inequality is considered fairly offensive. For the incurious, the taboo around this argument makes it exciting. But unlike people, not all ideas are created equally, and they should not be treated with the same amount of seriousness - especially when those ideas ignore both a broad scientific debate that's gone on for years and clear evidence that women in tech are excluded more than in other industries.

Full article: Science doesn't explain tech's diversity problem - History does

Rewriting the History of Women in Science (Scientific American)

As a young girl, I was lucky to never explicitly hear that science was not for girls. Instead I was encouraged to build soccer-playing robots, to set things on fire, and to spend hours gazing through microscopes and telescopes. And yet I was still scared away from science as a career by the constant, subtle insistence from all around me that my purpose was not to be a scientist but rather a wife and mother- as if these things were incompatible. The implication was clear: no matter how many degrees I might earn, I was destined to give up.

Full article: Rewriting the History of Women in Science