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CNIO Publications

Martin Krallinger, jefe de la Unidad de Minería de Textos en Biología del CNIO

Chemical Reviews

Spanish researchers review the state-of-the-art text mining technologies for chemistry

Madrid, 21 June, 2017

In a recent Chemical Reviews article, the Biological Text Mining Unit at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) together with with researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), of the University of Navarra, in Pamplona, and the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (BSC-CNS) have published the first exhaustive revision of the state-of-the-art methodologies underlying chemical search engines, named entity recognition and text mining systems. The rapidly growing field...

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LimTox

Nucleic Acids Research

CNIO presents an online tool to extract drug toxicity information from text

Madrid, 31 May, 2017

The Biological Text Mining Unit presents in a recent Nucleic Acids Research paper the LimTox online software tool developed at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO). This resource integrates state-of-the-art in text mining, machine learning and language technology methods in order to empower the underlying biomedical semantic search engine. LimTox allows retrieval and ranking of chemical and biological entities of interest, interactions between them, visualization of chemical...

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CRISPR para generar modelos celulares de cáncer

Stem Cell Reports

A protein, a 'molecular staple' and CRISPR to generate an Ewing sarcoma model

Madrid, 9 May, 2017

A team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has optimized a system capable of generating a cellular model of Ewing sarcoma. The technique, based on CRISPR and described in the pages of Stem Cell Reports, makes it possible to generate cellular models to analyse the mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of this and other diseases, as well as the search for new treatments.CRISPR, the famous genomic editing technique, not only serves to cure diseases but also to...

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Fibras de ADN replicándose

Cell Reports

Excessive DNA replication and its potential use against cancer

Madrid, 3 May, 2017

DNA over-replication is a phenomenon that can have devastating consequences for proliferating cells. When parts of the genome are duplicated more than once, cells suffer from ‘genomic instability’ (alterations to the structure, composition and/or number of chromosomes), and this process gives rise to aberrant cells as those detected in many carcinomas. The cooperation of two proteins called CDC6 and CDT1 is essential for normal DNA replication but when they are not properly regulated, the...

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Liver progenitor cells

Cell Reports

Liver progenitor cells are involved in the development of hepatic tumours

Madrid, 18 April, 2017

The malignant transformation of hepatocytes is the origin of most hepatocellular carcinomas, an aggressive type of liver cancer with high mortality rates. But these cells do not act alone. Research conducted by scientists at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) reveals how hepatocytes "recruit" and "instruct" liver progenitor cells to contribute to the hepatic lesions."The cellular origin of liver cancer, as well as the origin of tumour heterogeneity, are not clear yet and may be...

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c-Fos expressing pre-malignant mouse hepatocytes

The Journal of Experimental Medicine

A novel molecular link between cholesterol, inflammation and liver cancer

Madrid, 29 March, 2017

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly disease with no effective cure that develops in the context of liver diseases associated with chronic inflammation. A recent research article published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine describes how important a protein called c-Fos is for HCC development, because it affects cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocytes, the main cells of the liver. Using genetically modified mouse models (GEMMs), Erwin Wagner, director of the Cancer Cell Biology...

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Células metastásicas de cáncer de mama (en rojo) anidando en nichos metastásicos en el pulmón.

Nature Reviews

Tighten the grip on metastasis

Madrid, 17 March, 2017

Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related death and its appearance remains a phenomenon that is difficult to predict and manage. We now know that, prior to the arrival of the cancer cells, tumours prepare the ground in the organ that they will later colonise. These areas with ideal conditions for the onset of metastasis are called pre-metastatic niches and targeting them will help improve patient survival. These questions are the subject of a review paper published in Nature Reviews by an...

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Stem Cell Reports

'In vivo’ reprogramming induces signs of telomere rejuvenation

Madrid, 2 February, 2017

During the 'in vivo’ reprogramming process, cellular telomeres are extended due to an increase in endogenous telomerase. This is the main conclusion of a paper published in 'Stem Cell Reports' by a team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO). Their observations show, for the first time, that the reprogramming of living tissue results in telomerase activation and telomere elongation; thus reversing one of the hallmarks of aging: ‘the presence of short telomeres’. "We have...

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Imagen de la enzima oxidoreductasa

PNAS

Secrets of human protein interactions unveiled by massive sequencing and coevolution

Madrid, 15 December, 2016

Cells operate like an incredibly well-synchronized orchestra of molecular interactions among proteins. Understanding this molecular network is essential not only to understand how an organism works but also to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for a multitude of diseases. In fact, it has been observed that protein interacting regions are preferentially mutated in tumours. The investigation of many of these interactions is challenging. However, a study coordinated by Simone Marsili...

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El daño tisular es clave para la reprogramación celular

Science

Tissue damage is key for cell reprogramming

Madrid, 24 November, 2016

Cell reprogramming does not happen exactly as we thought. In the pages of the journal Science, a team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has shown that tissue damage is a relevant factor for cells to go back to an embryonic state. Cell reprogramming earned its discoverer, Shinya Yamanaka, the Nobel Prize and opened the door to regenerative medicine. This technique, based on introducing a combination of four genes known as OSKM (for the initials of the genes, OCT4,...

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