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The first effective therapy against glioblastoma by attacking telomeres

Cancer Cell

The first effective therapy against glioblastoma by attacking telomeres

Madrid, 13 November, 2017

The Telomere and Telomerase Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has shown that it is possible to block the growth of human and murine glioblastoma in mouse models by blocking the TRF1 protein; an essential component of the telomere-protective complex known as shelterin. The study, published in Cancer Cell, describes a new and promising way to combat this type of brain tumour, considered one of the most lethal and difficult to treat, by attacking its ability to...

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The PI3K pathway and TRF1, essentialfor the integrity of telomeres, are functionally connected.

Nature Communications

Two important signalling pathways in cancer and ageing are connected for the first time

Madrid, 2 November, 2017

The structure of proteins that protect telomeres (shelterin proteins, from “protective shield”) are promising targets to combat cancer but to date there has been no drug or effective form for attacking them. In the absence of drugs that destroy telomeres, cancer retains one of its most terrible properties, which is the ability of its cells to perpetually divide. Two years ago, the group led by Maria A. Blasco at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) hit upon several compounds that...

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Genes and Development

'Capicua’ gene plays a key role in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

Madrid, 21 September, 2017

Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered a genetic alteration that is directly involved in at least 10% of cases of one of the most common cancers in children, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In a paper published this week in the printed edition of Genes and Development, the scientists explain how the mice in which a specific gene, known as Capicua, has been inactivated, inevitably develop this type of leukaemia. They have also discovered...

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PNAS

A way to stabilize haploidy in animal cells

Madrid, 14 August, 2017

The emergence, in recent years, of the first mammalian haploid cell lines has raised great expectations in the scientific community. Despite their potential, these cultures present some issues that make their use complicated because Haploidy is unstable and can be lost quickly. The Genomic Instability Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has offered an explanation of this phenomenon and proposes a way to overcome it. Their work has been published this week in the...

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Nucleic Acids Research

New computational method enhances our understanding of the human epigenome

Madrid, 3 August, 2017

A team of scientists from different institutions such as the BSC, the Newcastle University and the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has developed a method to detect the epigenome areas where the changes that give rise to cellular diversity originate. These changes are also related to the cancer origin and development. In the study, which has been published in Nucleic Acids Research, they have developed a computational method that has been applied in hematopoiesis, the process of...

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Nature

A Braf kinase-inactive mutant induces lung adenocarcinoma

Madrid, 2 August, 2017

The initiating oncogenic event in almost half of human lung adenocarcinomas is still unknown, a fact that complicates the development of selective targeted therapies. Yet these tumours harbour a number of alterations without obvious oncogenic function including BRAF-inactivating mutations. Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have demonstrated that the expression of an endogenous Braf (D631A) kinase-inactive isoform in mice (corresponding to the human BRAF(D594A)...

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Clinical Cancer Research

New mutations related to hereditary neuroendocrine tumours

Madrid, 20 July, 2017

Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine tumours with a strong hereditary component. Half the genes whose alterations confer hereditary susceptibility to develop this condition code for enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle, a metabolic route involved in cellular respiration. A study by the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research identifies new genes associated with this cycle...

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Nature Medicine

CNIO scientists link new cancer treatments to cardiovascular alterations

Madrid, 10 July, 2017

Plk1 inhibitors have recently been acknowledged as an "Innovative Therapy for leukaemia" by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, a study published in Nature Medicine by researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) suggests that prolonged use of these inhibitors can not only lead to hypertension issues but also to the rupturing of blood vessels and severe cardiovascular problems.The idea behind personalised medicine is knowing the function of each one of our...

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Journal of the American Chemical Society

A new system to identify senescent cells 'in vivo' has been developed

Madrid, 5 July, 2017

Researchers from the the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), the Centre for Biomedical Research in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) and Cambridge University have developed a new system that allows the detection of senescent cells in vivo without damaging tissue. Their paper has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.The main objective of cellular senescence is to avoid the proliferation...

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Scientific Reports

New data on the protective effects of Alzheimer's on cancer

Madrid, 3 July, 2017

Patients with Alzheimer's disease have a higher risk of developing glioblastoma and a lower risk of lung cancer. A paper published in Scientific Reports by researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), headed by Alfonso Valencia, a researcher affiliated to the CNIO and to the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (BSC), describes the biological processes that underlie this comorbidity.  The increase in life expectancy has resulted in many people developing multiple...

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